3. What Is The Dipole Moment (magnitude And Direction) Of A System With A Charge Of -2 C Located At The (2024)

(a) The magnetic field at the center of the square is approximately 0.00168 Tesla (T). (b) The magnetic force on the electron passing through the center is approximately -3.23×10^(-14) Newtons (N).

The resulting magnetic field at the center of the square can be determined using the Biot-Savart law, which relates the magnetic field at a point to the current in a wire and the distance from the wire.

(a) Resulting Magnetic Field at the Center of the Square:

Since all four wires are parallel and pass through the vertices of the square, we can consider each wire separately and then sum up the magnetic fields contributed by each wire.

Let's denote the current-carrying wires as follows:

Wire 1: I1 = 1.11 A

Wire 2: I2 = 2.18 A

Wire 3: I3 = 3.14 A

Wire 4: I4 = 3.86 A

The magnetic field at the center of the square due to a single wire can be calculated using the Biot-Savart law as:

dB = (μ0 * I * dl × r) / (4π * r^3)

Where:

dB is the magnetic field contribution from a small segment dl of the wireμ0 is the permeability of free space (4π × 10^(-7) T*m/A)I is the current in the wiredl is a small segment of the wirer is the distance from the wire to the point where the magnetic field is calculated

Since the wires are long and parallel, we can assume that they are infinitely long, and the magnetic field will only have a component perpendicular to the plane of the square. Therefore, the magnetic field contributions from wires 1, 2, 3, and 4 will add up as vectors.

The magnetic field at the center of the square (B) will be the vector sum of the magnetic field contributions from each wire:

B = B1 + B2 + B3 + B4

Since the wires are at the vertices of the square, their distances from the center are equal to half the length of a side of the square, which is 17 cm / 2 = 8.5 cm = 0.085 m.

Let's calculate the magnetic field contributions from each wire:

For Wire 1 (I1 = 1.11 A):

dB1 = (μ0 * I1 * dl1 × r) / (4π * r^3)

For Wire 2 (I2 = 2.18 A):

dB2 = (μ0 * I2 * dl2 × r) / (4π * r^3)

For Wire 3 (I3 = 3.14 A):

dB3 = (μ0 * I3 * dl3 × r) / (4π * r^3)

For Wire 4 (I4 = 3.86 A):

dB4 = (μ0 * I4 * dl4 × r) / (4π * r^3)

Given that the wires are long and parallel, we can assume that they are straight, and each wire carries the same current for its entire length.

Assuming the wires have negligible thickness, the total magnetic field at the center of the square is:

B = B1 + B2 + B3 + B4

To find the resulting magnetic field at the center, we'll need the total magnetic field at the center of a single wire (B_single). We can calculate it using the Biot-Savart law with the appropriate values.

dB_single = (μ0 * I_single * dl × r) / (4π * r^3)

Integrating both sides of the equation:

∫ dB_single = ∫ (μ0 * I_single * dl × r) / (4π * r^3)

Since the wires are long and parallel, they have the same length, and we can represent it as L.

∫ dB_single = (μ0 * I_single * L) / (4π * r^3) * ∫ dl

∫ dB_single = (μ0 * I_single * L) / (4π * r^3) * L

∫ dB_single = (μ0 * I_single * L^2) / (4π * r^3)

Now, we can substitute the known values into the equation and find the magnetic field at the center of a single wire:

B_single = (μ0 * I_single * L^2) / (4π * r^3)

B_single = (4π × 10^(-7) T*m/A * I_single * L^2) / (4π * (0.085 m)^3)

B_single = (10^(-7) T*m/A * I_single * L^2) / (0.085^3 m^3)

Substituting the values of I_single = 1.11 A, L = 0.17 m (since it is the length of the side of the square), and r = 0.085 m:

B_single = (10^(-7) T*m/A * 1.11 A * (0.17 m)^2) / (0.085^3 m^3)

B_single ≈ 0.00042 T

Now, to find the total magnetic field at the center of the square (B), we can sum up the contributions from each wire:

B = B_single + B_single + B_single + B_single

B = 4 * B_single

B ≈ 4 * 0.00042 T

B ≈ 0.00168 T

Therefore, the resulting magnetic field at the center of the square is approximately 0.00168 Tesla.

(b) Magnetic Force on an Electron Passing through the Center of the Square:

To calculate the magnetic force acting on an electron moving at the speed of 3.9 × 10^6 fps (feet per second) when passing through the center of the square, we can use the equation for the magnetic force on a charged particle moving through a magnetic field:

F = q * v * B

Where:

F is the magnetic forceq is the charge of the particlev is the velocity of the particleB is the magnetic field

The charge of an electron (q) is -1.6 × 10^(-19) C (Coulombs).

Converting the velocity from fps to m/s:

1 fps ≈ 0.3048 m/s

v = 3.9 × 10^6 fps * 0.3048 m/s/fps

v ≈ 1.188 × 10^6 m/s

Now we can calculate the magnetic force on the electron:

F = (-1.6 × 10^(-19) C) * (1.188 × 10^6 m/s) * (0.00168 T)

F ≈ -3.23 × 10^(-14) N

The negative sign indicates that the magnetic force acts in the opposite direction to the velocity of the electron.

Therefore, the magnetic force acting on the electron when passing through the center of the square is approximately -3.23 × 10^(-14) Newtons.

To learn more about Biot-Savart law, Visit:

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3. What Is The Dipole Moment (magnitude And Direction) Of A System With A Charge Of -2 C Located At The (2024)
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